Nearly half of young women say they feel unsafe walking alone at night. This causes them to avoid going out at night alone. I helped design an app called SOLO to help women avoid danger when walking alone.

SOLO

My Role    

  • UX Research: conducted competitive analysis and user testing. Led the affinity mapping and user journey process.

  • UX Design: prototyping experiences at low and high fidelity through concept sketches, wireframes, and interactive prototypes. 

  • User Communication: represented the team by communicating with the users to schedule interviews and testing sessions.

Timeline    

August 2019 - December 2019 

 

*Project is currently in progress 

Primary Prototyping Tool

Adobe XD

Team​ Members

Anjali, Yujin, and Nektar

Results​

  • This project is still in progress! Please check back for results in December.

SOLO

Background

According to publicly available reports, 50% feel unsafe when they are walking alone at night.

Many solutions have been created such as wearable technology, location sharing, and security apps. Despite the high statistics and adverse effects of this problem, a robust product or system does not currently exist.

 The Problem

Currently, many women feel unsafe walking alone at night and there is no all encompassing existing solution to aid in reducing fear and increasing safety.

Our group chose to explore what creating a system to help keep women safer at night could look like.

Process

Competitive Analysis

We studied safety applications and wearable technology aimed at keeping women safe.

We wanted to understand what current market products were offering and what they may be missing.

Revolar

bSafe

Eyewatch SOS

I created a chart to compare the features offered by each product.

From this chart, we could clearly see that all the products did not have the same features. Users would have to have multiple products in order to get all the features they may need.

**This chart is a part of a larger evaluation.**

From this competitive analysis, we know that the new SOLO app should have:

1. Emergency connections to family and friends, a hotline, and/or police.

2. A map to help with navigation, share location, and obtain safety information.

3. Feedback to communicate reliability and that the product is currently working.

“I would never call the police as a preventative measure. I think it would just be a waste of their time.”

User 3

 Interviews, & Surveys

To better understand  our users we conducted semi-structured interviews with 9 women Going into the interview we had many assumptions, such as our users would definitely want a weapon and that they probably could just call the police.

 However, our interviews did not confirm our assumptions. Next, a survey was created based on what was learned from our initial interviews. In this survey, 36 women helped us understand what they truly needed to feel safe.

During the interview, we had participants write about conditions that make them feel safe or unsafe. We also asked them what they may do to stay safe. We used this information to help us formulate our survey questions in order to gain even more insight.

Results

Below are the findings from our interviews, and survey.

Affinity Map

Next, we chose to complete an Affinity Map in order to organize the information we learned from our users. 

Our users wanted to be able to stay safe, but after completing the affinity map we realized there were many reasons why this was a challenge for them.

Understanding The Users

Based on the data obtained, we created Empathy Maps and User Personas to help to better empathize with the users and their story. 

There are two main user groups represented by Marie and Leigh.

Next, we mapped out the User Journey to identify points of fear and anxiety when walking alone at night.

We also used the Journey Map to identify touch points and potential opportunities.

 User Pain Points

From the research conducted, we identified many challenges in regards to walking alone at night as a young adult woman.

Below we identified a few of the major pain points experienced by users that were prioritized for the first iterations. Insights were ranked,  and this was used to prioritize pain points.

Users needed more information about the safety levels of areas in new cities.

01

 Problems to Solve

Pain point identification let us to the following problems to solve:

How might we connect users to other people quickly?

How might we share safety reports and authentic news stories with easily?

Brainstorm 

The "How Might We" questions helped guide us to specific problems to solve.

We used what we learned about our users to begin to brainstorm different ways to solve the pain points identified.

Next Steps

We utilized a Creativity vs. Feasibility Graph in order to narrow our solutions down to a few ideas that addressed pain points at different points of the users' journey.

We wanted to think outside the box, but we also did not want to create systems that were too expensive or too far ahead of current technology.

Final Design. A final design will be created to present to our industry partners at NCR. In this presentation, we will outline what we learned from our research and provide suggestions to the EXD team on potential solutions to the problem based on user research and testing.

02

03

Prototypes. We plan to create prototypes for the solutions that our users select as being most valuable to them. We will test these prototypes with our users in order to get feedback and make sure that we are meeting their needs. 

Brain Storm. Next, we plan to utilize all we have learned about our users to begin to divergently brainstorm many different ways that we can solve this problem. We will prioritize ideas with the guidelines given by our industry partners, sketch the most promising ideas, and get feedback from out users.

01

Potential Solutions

Our chart helped us narrow down our ideas to three possible solutions. Next, based on user feedback we created detailed sketches and paper prototypes of each potential solution. 

We referred back to all of out user research, user pain points, and "How Might We" questions in order to make sure we stayed focused on user needs.

01

Transportation App & Key Fob

This transportation application presents users with two modes to use when feeling unsafe. Users can select SOLO and be directed to a bike, scooter, or rental car to drive. Users can select DUO and be directed to a projected meeting spot for pickup by a ride share service.

News & Media App and Wearable

 

This application presents users with the safest route to walk based on safety ratings. Users are guided audibly by a corresponding wearable technology. Users also see local news reports for areas along their route.

02

03

Buddy Walking ​App

This application shows other people nearby that are walking to a similar destination. Users can select a person to be a walking buddy to their destination.

We presented our solutions to our users for user testing. 

Below I highlighted some of the feedback received.

01

Transportation Solution

Users liked the familiarity of the app in comparison to other ride share apps, but they did not want to worry about how they would know they were on the fastest route to a ride.

02

News & Media Solution

Users liked the ability to see local news stories for areas near them. However, they stated they were unsure how to interact with the wearable.

03

Buddy Walking Solution

Users liked the idea of not having to walk alone, but many users worried about the potential stereotypes that this idea could encourage.

Information Architecture

Information Architecture diagram was created to help me understand how teachers would navigate the site. 

I also explored the Information Architecture of competitors' digital plan books in order to understand how teachers are already navigating digital plan books.

Wireframes & Mocks

Wireframes were created and tested with users in order to get feedback to inform design iterations. Mocks were also created to showcase all screens.

Users really liked the features _______

Iterations 

The first iteration was completed back in January 2019 when I was first working on this project. I did not know much about design, but I worked hard to solve the problems the users were having.

We put our prototype in front of our users to get their feedback on the first iteration 

We put our prototype in front of our users to get their feedback on the first iteration 

We put our prototype in front of our users to get their feedback on the first iteration 

The second iteration was completed in September after receiving feedback from the users on Iteration 1. Below you will see the changes made.

We put our prototype in front of our users to get their feedback on the first iteration 

We put our prototype in front of our users to get their feedback on the first iteration 

We put our prototype in front of our users to get their feedback on the first iteration 

Final Design

The final design created from all the research generated and user feedback is presented below.

Specific features were added to address the "How Might We" questions identified.

Feature

 

We put our prototype in front of our users to get their feedback on the first iteration 

Feature

 

We put our prototype in front of our users to get their feedback on the first iteration 

User Flow

 User Testing

The final design was placed in front of users for testing to inform future iterations of the design.

Users were given tasks to complete and were asked to think aloud while completing these tasks. Users were also asked questions about individual screens.

After completing user testing, I received the following user feedback:

01

Tools were combined from Magellan and Tandem Web Tools to ensure that our users had access to all of the functionality needed to efficiently do their jobs. Users were also given the ability to see different views within the same page in order to reduce the need to navigate to different pages.

An information icon with a pop up help card was added to help our users make sense of reports and codes that appeared on the page.

02

03

We wanted to ensure our application was available to all of our users by making it a web based application that could be accessed through a URL. 

Next Steps

01

02

03

Brain Storm. Next, we plan to utilize all we have learned about our users to begin to divergently brainstorm many different ways that we can solve this problem. We will prioritize ideas with the feedback given by our users, sketch the most promising ideas, and get more feedback from out users.

Prototypes. We plan to create prototypes for the solutions that our users select as being most valuable to them. We will test these prototypes with our users and iterate on them in order to make sure that we are meeting their needs. 

Final Design. A final design will be created to present. In this presentation, we will outline what we learned from our research and provide a solution to the problem based on user research and testing.

Lessons Learned

You are not the user

Due to the fact that I am also a teacher, it was tempting at times to want to design for what I would want or need. TO

Consider other stakeholders' perspective

School principals and school coaches are an integral part of the lesson planning process. They review teachers' plans in order to give feedback and ensure they align to school and district goals and state standards. Moving forward, I plan to consider how to utilize this system to  help principal's and coaches meet their needs.

Utilize Familiarity

Many teachers mentioned that they do not have much time to complete all of their required tasks. It is important for technology for teachers to utilize structures and language that teachers are already familiar with in order to reduce the time they would need to spend to learn a new platform.